VIDEO: Watch This Chameleon Hatch and Take Its First Steps – Amazing!

KS NatureScreen Shot 2015-05-14 at 11.50.39 AMThere is a reason this video of a chameleon hatching – posted in 2008 – has over 1,715,098 views. I could do without the epic music, but overall this video is absolutely captivating; it starts changing colors within minutes. You can watch its tiny two-toed zygodactylous feet and independently mobile eyes experience the world for the first time. Click below to watch the incredible footage!

Chameleon Reproduction

 

veiled-chameleonMost chameleon species lay eggs (oviparous), while a few give birth to live young (ovoviviparous).

The oviparous species lay eggs three to six weeks after mating takes place. The female will dig a hole in the ground and deposit her eggs, covering them with dirt, keeping them warm and safe. The mom then leaves the eggs to hatch and fend for themselves – which can take anywhere from 4-12 months, even longer for some species. Chameleon babies are independent at birth and must find their own food and shelter.

A batch of chameleon eggs is referred to as a ‘clutch.’ Clutch sizes vary greatly depending on the species. Click here to view an African Flapneck chameleon burrow her eggs and wait for the babies to hatch and catch their first snack!

The ovoviviparous species, like Jackson’s chameleons, have a five to seven-month gestation period. Each young chameleon is born within the sticky transparent membrane of its yolk sac. Once the membrane bursts, newly hatched chameleon babies free themselves and climb away for their first feeding.

Video

This ‘Punk Rock’ Frog Can Change Its Skin From Spiky To Silky Smooth

KS Strange ScienceWe are familiar with amphibians and reptiles that can change color, but this frog can actually change the texture of its skin! This unique feature makes it the only vertebrate known to do so.

Dubbed the ‘Punk Rocker’ frog, or Pristimantis mutabilis, the marble-sized amphibian lives in the rain forest of Ecuador. It was discovered by scientist Katherine Krynak in 2009. According to National Geographic, Krynak spotted the frog while on a nighttime walk, and decided to bring the thorny specimen back for closer observation. Once she got home, she saw the frog was slimy and smooth, not what she expected! Eventually, the spines reemerged, and Krynak realized she had made an incredible discovery.

Scientists believe the shifting skin texture serves as a form of camouflage in the wild, helping the frog blend into its mossy environment.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUAN M. GUAYASAMIN (RIGHT) AND LUCAS BUSTAMANTE (LEFT), THE ZOOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY
PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUAN M. GUAYASAMIN (RIGHT) AND LUCAS BUSTAMANTE (LEFT), THE ZOOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY

After 9 years, Krynak and her colleagues finally gathered enough data to prove it was a new species. Now, the frog finally has a formal name: the mutable rainfrog, or Pristimantis mutabilis. But, we’re going to keep calling it the ‘Punk Rocker’ frog 🙂

This ‘Punk Rock’ Frog Can Change Its Skin From Spiky To Silky Smooth