First Known Venomous Frogs Uses Spiky Faces To Deliver Deadly Headbutt

KS Strange ScienceDon’t try to¬†butt heads with these little guys – it¬†just might kill you! The first known venomous frogs have been discovered Brazil. They use small spines¬†on their head, and a vicious head thrash, to inject their potent venom. Yikes! ūüźł

Corythomantis greeningi. CREDIT: Carlos Jared / Butantan Institute
Corythomantis greeningi. CREDIT: Carlos Jared / Butantan Institute

Poisonous frogs are nothing new, but ‘truly’¬†venomous frogs are.¬†Traditionally, venomous creatures bite, sting or stab you to do their damage, while you have to¬†bite or touch poisonous critters to feel their effects. I suppose the venomous variety are a bit more proactive with their toxins. ūüźć

‚ÄúDiscovering a truly venomous frog is nothing any of us expected, and finding frogs with skin secretions more venomous than those of the deadly pit vipers of the genus Bothrops was astounding,‚ÄĚ co-author Edmund Brodie, Jr., of Utah State University said in a press release.

Brodie and his colleague Carlos Jared of Instituto Butantan in S√£o Paulo, Brazil, study¬†Corythomantis greeningi¬†(Greening‚Äôs frog)¬†and¬†Aparasphenodon brunoi¬†(Bruno‚Äôs casque-headed frog). Jared learned the frogs were venomous the hard way after a Greening’s frog¬†‘stung’ his hand, which resulted in excruciating pain that spread up his arm – lasting five hours!

According to NBC News, a single gram of the venom from the more toxic frog species, Aparasphenodon brunoi, could kill more than 300,000 mice, or about 80 humans, while a gram of the venom from Corythomantis greeningi could kill more than 24,000 mice, or about six humans.

The frogs release a white, toxic mucus from glands in their skin when they feel threatened. Then they use the spines on their skull to drive the toxins into its enemy’s¬†flesh. No thanks…

 

First Known Venomous Frogs Uses Spiky Faces To Deliver Deadly Headbutt

Seven New Teeny Tiny Mini-Frogs Discovered in Brazil – Some are the Smallest Ever

KS Nature

These newly discovered mini-frogs are so small they barely fit on your fingernail – but, they do come in some flashy colors!

Brachycephalus (Anura: Brachycephalidae) is a remarkable genus of miniaturized frogs that call the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest home. The first Brachycephalus species was found in 1824, but most of the species have been discovered over the past 15 years.

The seven new species live on seven distinct mountaintops in south eastern Brazil. Their habitats are known as ‘cloud forests.’ Each species is cut off from one another due to dips and valleys with varying climates that act as environmental barriers.

Brachycephalus are a group of frogs known for their bright colors and miniscule size Рsome are the smallest terrestrial vertebrates on record (less than 1cm). Their tiny frog anatomy has shrunk to their size, but one thing has changed. These amphibians typically have three toes and two fingers, instead of the five toes and four fingers found in most frogs.

Their skin is what sets them apart. They vary in color and texture; some are rough and bumpy, while others are quite smooth. Their bright colors alert predators to the poisonous toxins in their skin. Those with brighter colors often reflect higher levels of the deadly chemical tetrodotoxin.

The severe isolation experienced by these frogs has produced 21 known species of Brachycephalus Рand a new study has pushed that count to 28.

Brachycephalus comes in a variety of bright colors IMAGE: MARCIO R. PIE, CC BY SA
Brachycephalus comes in a variety of bright colors IMAGE: MARCIO R. PIE, CC BY SA

Marcio Pie, a professor at the Universidade Federal do Paraná in Brazil, led researchers into the remote misty rainforest in search of these tiny critters. Following extensive fieldwork, treacherous hikes, and hours of sifting through dirt and leaves, they found a surprising seven new species of Brachycephalus!

Marcio Pie’s¬†findings were published June 4 in the¬†journal¬†PeerJ.

Seven New Teeny Tiny Mini-Frogs Discovered in Brazil – Some are the Smallest Ever

Insane Frog Births: These Babies Greet the World From Mom’s Mouth and Mom’s BACK!

KS Strange ScienceI’d like to introduce you to two very special amphibians. One gives birth through its mouth, and was brought back from the dead. The other has given me terrifying nightmares since I was a kid. This is mainly¬†due to the fact that it gives birth to live¬†young from¬†its back. Scroll down if you dare.

The Gastric-Brooding Frog

Gastric-Brooding Frog

The gastric-brooding frog is famous for two reasons; it gives birth out of its mouth, and it was literally brought back from extinction.

This unique species of frog is native to Queensland in eastern Australia. The female swallows her fertilized eggs and incubates them in her stomach for roughly six weeks. Don’t worry, she doesn’t digest them! Chemicals released by the eggs tells her stomach to stop producing acid and she stops eating. Around 20 to 25 tadpoles hatch inside her and the mucus from their gills continues to keep the acid at bay.¬†Over the next six weeks, as the hatchlings grow and her stomach bloats, mom’s lungs collapse and she is forced to breathe through¬†her skin. She then ‘vomits’ out her fully formed frog babies.

The gastric-brooding frog went extinct in 1983, but researchers in Australia brought it back! Click here¬†to learn more about the “Lazarus Project” and ‘de-extinction’ technology¬†ūüôā


 The Suriname Toad

Image: sandiegozoo.org
Image: sandiegozoo.org

The Suriname sea toad is flat and gives birth out of its back! The female toad’s offspring develop from eggs to frogs underneath her skin. No joke, the video below could actually make me vomit, so I’m just going to leave it below for your creepy viewing pleasure.

This species is famous for its reproductive abilities. The female Suriname toad can carry up to 100 eggs in her back Рforming an irregular honeycomb design.

The male toad produces a sharp clicking noise by snapping the hyoid bone in its throat,¬†which attracts a nearby partner. The female¬†rises from the floor –> the male mounts her back¬†–>¬†they begin flipping through the water¬†–> the female releases eggs with each flip¬†–> the male fertilizes them before he helps embed the eggs in her skin.

Once the eggs are implanted, a film forms over them, creating protective pockets (gross). Four months later, the fully grown frogs punch their way through the skin to freedom.

Insane Frog Births: These Babies Greet the World From Mom’s Mouth and Mom’s BACK!